Brining the US together one state dessert at a time!

This is the last of the state desserts. I hope you’ve enjoyed the interesting history and through food, how we’ve come together as a nation.

As a treat, this is the last of my free audio books, enjoy!

ACX promo codes at audible.com/acx-promo

The Black Madonna: A Popes Deadly Obsession AXLADD7SHZ7NC

Chilled to the Bones 3RF49X8FCMBES

Death on the Vine 9T8E6ABCAKMEX

 

Wyoming S’Mores

THOUGH NOBODY QUITE agrees on where s’mores came from (or who gave them their silly name), it’s clear to me that the things could only have been invented by a kid. Nobody over ten-years-old would ever think of squishing together a chocolate bar, a toasted marshmallow, and a pair of graham crackers, and calling it food.

That said, the s’more’s long yet vague history, dates back at least to 1927 when a recipe for the more formally designated “some mores” appeared in Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts, a helpful tome which also includes instructions for building 12 different kinds of campfires. Other sources attribute the original recipe to the Campfire Girls; and there’s also an argument that the gooey treat has its origins in the Victorian era, when popular picks for desserts were “sandwich cookies” and sponge cakes, variously filled with jam, cream, or lemon curd.

Alternatively, if the jump from elegant tea cake to sticky campfire snack seems a little much, other inspirational possibilities include the Mallomar—a graham cracker cookie topped with a blob of marshmallow and coated with chocolate, manufactured by Nabisco and first sold in Hoboken, New Jersey, in 1913; or the MoonPie—a pair of graham cracker cookies with a marshmallow filling, dipped in chocolate – that first went on the market in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1917.

 

 

 Ingredients

  • 2 HERSHEY’S milk chocolate bars, broken into halves
  • 4 graham crackers, broken into halves
  • 4 marshmallows

Directions

Place ½ of milk chocolate bar on graham cracker half. Carefully toast a marshmallow over grill or campfire until crispy on the outside and gooey on the inside. Place roasted marshmallow over chocolate and top with second graham cracker half; gently press together.

What I found is that there are so many different S’More recipes, Baked Alaska, In a Jar, etc. give it a try.

 

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time

What’s a Danish without reading a great book…and the audible is free for my friends.

The Black Madonna: A Popes Deadly Obsession

ACX at audible.com/acx-promo9DF5NPZFRH985

 

Chilled to the Bones

3H93A6BETAY53

 

Death on the Vine

9T8E6ABCAKMEX

Wisconsin Kringle Danish Kringle Recipe

Just a Treat, It’s a Tradition.”

The Official State Pastry of Wisconsin, Racine Danish Kringles was also recognized as a Something Special from Wisconsin™ product, which is an organization that supports local farmers, food processors, entrepreneurs, as well as the Wisconsin way of life.

1st Place Award in Baker’s Best Kringle Competition from the Wisconsin Bakers Association for our new flavor, Sea Salt and Caramel Cheesecake. (2013)

Loxodonta Africana Award from the Zoological Society of Milwaukee’s (ZSM’s) for Racine Danish Kringles outstanding support of the ZSM and Milwaukee County Zoo. (2013)

Member of the Serengeti Circle Zoological Society of Milwaukee whose mission is to support the Milwaukee County Zoo, educate the public about wildlife and conserve endangered species.

Racine Danish Kringles gives to many local charities throughout the year to support great causes such as the Children’s Hospital of Milwaukee, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Zoological Society, The Hope House of Milwaukee, Worldwide Hunger Relief, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, American Lung Association and many others.

 

 

Meet Wisconsin’s official state pastry! This Danish Kringle Recipe tastes EXACTLY like the real thing, but it has been adapted so you can make it at home.

Prep Time 10 minutes

Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes

Cooling time 1 hour

Total Time 1 hour 40 minutes

Servings 8 servings

Calories 348 kcal

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 1cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2cup butter cut into small pieces and chilled (1 stick)
  • 2tablespoons ice water

For the filling:

  • 1cup water
  • 1/2cup butter (1 stick)
  • 1cup all-purpose flour
  • 3large eggs
  • 1/2teaspoon almond extract

For the icing:

  • 1cup powdered sugar
  • 2 to 3tablespoons milk
  • 1tablespoon butter softened
  • 1/2teaspoon almond extract
  • Sprinkles or sliced almondsfor decorating, optional

Instructions

To make the crust:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, combine flour and chilled butter pieces. Using a knife or pastry cutter, cut into dough until pea-sized crumbs form. Sprinkle with ice water, stirring with a fork until soft dough forms.
  2. Divide dough into 2 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a 3-inch x 12-inch strip and press on to ungreased baking sheet. Set aside.

To make the filling:

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine water and butter; bring to a boil. Remove from heat and immediately stir in flour. Whisk until smooth.
  2. Add eggs, one at a time, whisking until smooth after each addition. Stir in almond extract.
  3. Divide the filling between the two crusts, spreading to 3/4-inch from the edge of the crust. Bake until golden brown and puffy, 50 to 60 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven and cool completely, at least 1 hour. The topping will shrink and fall as the Kringle cools.

To make the icing:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together powdered sugar, milk, butter, and almond extract smooth. If the frosting seems to thick, add more milk, 1 teaspoon at a time, until smooth enough to drizzle.
  2. Drizzle each Kringle with icing. Top with sprinkles or sliced almonds if desired.

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time.

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What could be better than a warm molasses cookie?

West Virginia: Molasses Cookies

Sometimes you just get a craving for something. For me, the something was molasses cookies. Big soft, raisin molasses cookies. Today it is rainy and thundery and chilly, perfect for baking.

I found the recipe I wanted in Joy of Cooking, after a search through my recipe box and two favorite cookie cookbooks. I altered it slightly and they came out just as I envisioned, plump and soft and spicy.

 

 
1/3 c. molasses
1 c. shortening (butter flavor Crisco)
1 c. sugar (plus some for rolling)
1 egg
2 c. flour
2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. ginger
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. cloves, ground

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In large bowl cream sugar, shortening; add molasses, egg, mix until well blended. In a small bowl sift together dry ingredients. Add gradually to shortening mixture until well blended. Chill mixture at least 1 hour. When well chilled, with hands make 1 inch balls of dough and roll in sugar. Bake immediately on an ungreased cookie sheet 10-12 minutes or until centers look dry but not firm. Cookies should be flexible, not crisp.

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bringing the US together one state dessert at a time

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Washington: Apple Crisp

Apple Crisp or Apple Crumble is another delicious dessert for Fall. It is a dessert made of baked apples topped with a crisp streusel crust.

The earliest recipe was posted in 1924 “Everybody’s Cook Book: A Comprehensive Manual of Home Cookery” by Isabel Ely Lord. There was also a recipe for Apple Crisp in a newspaper article in the “Appleton Post Crescent” on Dec. 9, 1924.

Since those first publications of the recipe, it has become a very popular dessert in the U.S., especially during Fall.

 

1 hour 20 mins

 

This delicious dessert features amazing Washington Apples

INGREDIENTS

Filling

  • 6-8 Large Washington apples (I used a combination of Granny Smith, Pink Lady & Cameo)
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter (melted)
  • 3 Tablespoons Flour
  • 1 Tablespoon Lemon Juice
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla
  • ½ cup Brown Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Cinnamon

Topping

  • 2 cups Oats
  • 1 cup Brown Sugar
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter (melted)
  • 2 teaspoon Cinnamon

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Peel & Slice the apples
  2. Mix together with the other filling ingredients
  3. Place in a greased 9×13 baking dish
  4. In a bowl, combine all topping ingredients
  5. Stir together until well combined
  6. Pour and spread over apples
  7. Bake at 400 degrees for 1 hour, or until the topping is browned
  8. Serve warm with ice cream and a caramel drizzle

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time…and we really need to do this.

Visit me at http://www.lindaleekane.com

 

 

Virginia Chess Pie

Chess pies are a Southern specialty that has a simple filling of eggs, sugar, butter, and a small amount of flour. Some recipes include cornmeal, and others are made with vinegar.  Flavorings, such as vanilla, lemon juice, or chocolate, are also added to vary the basic recipe.

The origin of the name, Chess Pie, is uncertain, but there are plenty of guesses and a bit of folklore surrounding the name.  The most probable explanation is that since the English lemon curd pie filling is very close to lemon chess pie, and they believe the word “chess” is an Americanization of the English word “cheese,” referring to curd pie.  Basically the Chess Pie is a cheese-less cheesecake.

 

Some folklore:

One explanation suggests that the word is chest, pronounced with a drawl and used to describe these pies baked with so much sugar they could be stored in a pie chest rather than refrigerated.

Another story is about the plantation cook who was asked what she was baking that smelled so great – “Jes pie was her answer.”

 

 

Ingredients

  • 1-1/3 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup melted butter
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped nuts, pecans or walnuts
  • 2/3 cup raisins
  • 1 unbaked 9-inch pastry shell

Instructions

Heat together the sugar and butter until well blended. Add the eggs, water, and vanilla and beat again. Stir in the nuts and raisins. Pour into the pastry shell and bake in a moderate oven (375 degrees F) for 45 minutes. Cool to room temperature and serve with whipped cream.

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time.

Visit me at lindaleekane.com

 Can you think of anything tastier?

Washington: Apple Crisp

 

Apple Crisp or Apple Crumble is another delicious dessert for Fall. It is a dessert made of baked apples topped with a crisp streusel crust.

The earliest recipe was posted in 1924 “Everybody’s Cook Book: A Comprehensive Manual of Home Cookery” by Isabel Ely Lord. There was also a recipe for Apple Crisp in a newspaper article in the “Appleton Post Crescent” on Dec. 9, 1924.

Since those first publications of the recipe, it has become a very popular dessert in the U.S., especially during Fall.

 

1 hour 20 mins

 

This delicious dessert features amazing Washington Apples

INGREDIENTS

Filling

  • 6-8 Large Washington apples (I used a combination of Granny Smith, Pink Lady & Cameo)
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter (melted)
  • 3 Tablespoons Flour
  • 1 Tablespoon Lemon Juice
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla
  • ½ cup Brown Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Cinnamon

Topping

  • 2 cups Oats
  • 1 cup Brown Sugar
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter (melted)
  • 2 teaspoon Cinnamon

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Peel & Slice the apples
  2. Mix together with the other filling ingredients
  3. Place in a greased 9×13 baking dish
  4. In a bowl, combine all topping ingredients
  5. Stir together until well combined
  6. Pour and spread over apples
  7. Bake at 400 degrees for 1 hour, or until the topping is browned
  8. Serve warm with ice cream and a caramel drizzle

 

Posted in UnFiltered Material | Leave a comment

Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time.

Visit me at lindaleekane.com

 

Virginia Chess Pie

Chess pies are a Southern specialty that has a simple filling of eggs, sugar, butter, and a small amount of flour. Some recipes include cornmeal and others are made with vinegar.  Flavorings, such as vanilla, lemon juice, or chocolate are also added to vary the basic recipe.

The origin of the name, Chess Pie, is uncertain, but there are plenty of guesses and a bit of folklore surrounding the name.  The most probable explanation is that since the English lemon curd pie filling is very close to lemon chess pie, and they believe the word “chess” is an Americanization of the English word “cheese,” referring to curd pie.  Basically the Chess Pie is a cheese-less cheesecake.

 

Some folklore:

One explanation suggests that the word is chest, pronounced with a drawl and used to describe these pies baked with so much sugar they could be stored in a pie chest rather than refrigerated.

Another story is about the plantation cook who was asked what she was baking that smelled so great – “Jes pie was her answer.”

 

 

Ingredients

  • 1-1/3 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup melted butter
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped nuts, pecans or walnuts
  • 2/3 cup raisins
  • 1 unbaked 9-inch pastry shell

Instructions

Heat together the sugar and butter until well blended. Add the eggs, water, and vanilla and beat again. Stir in the nuts and raisins. Pour into the pastry shell and bake in a moderate oven (375 degrees F) for 45 minutes. Cool to room temperature and serve with whipped cream.

Posted in UnFiltered Material | Leave a comment

Brining the US together one state dessert at a time.

Visit me at lindaleekane.com

 

Free audibles

ACX promotion codes can only be redeemed at audible.com/acx-promo and they are almost gone…so what do you have to lose?

 

Chilled to the Bones A57YCU67JLQHS

Death on the Vine 8AAPDM7KKMKGW

The Black Madonna: A Popes Deadly Obsession 9DFSNPZFRH985

Vermont Apple Pie

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds peeled, cored, sliced tart apples
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cinnamon
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • Pinch nutmeg
  • Two 9-inch pie crusts
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon water

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Mix sliced apples with sugar, cinnamon, flour, and nutmeg. Place 1 of the pie crusts into a 9-inch pie plate. Place the apple mixture into the piecrust and cover with a crust top. Add butter into apples, if desired. Combine the egg and water and beat to make an egg glaze. Brush the top crust with the egg glaze for a nice glossy appearance—Bake in the oven for 50 to 55 minutes. Make sure to place pie on a tray to prevent juices from spilling into the range.

Test pie with a sharp knife to feel if apples are tender enough for your taste. If necessary, cook pie for 5 minutes more and test again. Repeat process if desired.

Cool and serve with ice cream or any of your favorite toppings.

This recipe was provided by a chef, restaurant or culinary professional. It has not been tested for home use.

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Bringing the U.S. together one state dessert at a time.

Visit me at lindaleekane.com

 

This was so fantastic, you’d be silly not to make it for your friends and family.

 

Virginia Chess Pie

Chess pies are a Southern specialty that has a simple filling of eggs, sugar, butter, and a small amount of flour. Some recipes include cornmeal and others are made with vinegar.  Flavorings, such as vanilla, lemon juice, or chocolate are also added to vary the basic recipe.

The origin of the name, Chess Pie, is uncertain, but there are plenty of guesses and a bit of folklore surrounding the name.  The most probable explanation is that since the English lemon curd pie filling is very close to lemon chess pie, and they believe the word “chess” is an Americanization of the English word “cheese,” referring to curd pie.  Basically the Chess Pie is a cheese-less cheesecake.

 

Some folklore:

One explanation suggests that the word is chest, pronounced with a drawl and used to describe these pies baked with so much sugar they could be stored in a pie chest rather than refrigerated.

Another story is about the plantation cook who was asked what she was baking that smelled so great – “J’es’ pie was her answer.”

 

 

Ingredients

  • 1-1/3 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup melted butter
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped nuts, pecans or walnuts
  • 2/3 cup raisins
  • 1 unbaked 9-inch pastry shell

Instructions

Heat together the sugar and butter until well blended. Add the eggs, water, and vanilla and beat again. Stir in the nuts and raisins. Pour into the pastry shell and bake in a moderate oven (375 degrees F) for 45 minutes. Cool to room temperature and serve with whipped cream.

Posted in UnFiltered Material | Leave a comment

Brining the U.S. together one state dessert at a time.

Visit me at lindaleekane.com

Last of the free audibles

ACX Promo Codes can only be redeemed at audible.com/acx

Death on the Vine    7HWG84GL4ZQYK

The Black Madonna: A Popes Deadly Obsession  8ST2RU9AJUFAU

Chilled to the Bones 9KGJ6EAAREQ9H

 

This recipe is incredibly delicious.

Vermont Apple Pie

 

Vermont designated the apple as official state fruit in 1999 (and also recognized apple pie as the official state pie).

Vermont grows more than 150 varieties of apples.  Pick-your-own apples are a popular feature – about 200,000 bushels are picked by visitors to Vermont orchards every year. 

Apples have been grown in the United States since Colonial times.  The only apple native to North America is the crabapple; the first varieties for eating were planted by the pilgrims at Massachusetts Bay Colony.  Peter Stuyvesant planted an apple tree in his Manhattan orchard in 1647, and George Washington is said to have enjoyed pruning his apple trees.

About 2.500 varieties are now grown in the United States.  Apples grow in every state, and seven states have designated a variety of apple or simply “the apple” as a state symbol.

 

Ingredients

  • 1 recipe pastry for a 9 inch double crust deep dish pie
  • 3/4 cup white sugar
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 8 Macintosh apples – peeled, cored, and thinly sliced
  • 2/3 cup sliced almonds (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons butter

 

 

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Mix sliced apples with sugar, cinnamon, flour, and nutmeg. Place 1 of the pie crusts into a 9-inch pie plate. Place the apple mixture into the piecrust and cover with a crust top. Add butter into apples, if desired. Combine the egg and water and beat to make an egg glaze. Brush the top crust with the egg glaze for a nice glossy appearance—Bake in the oven for 50 to 55 minutes. Make sure to place pie on a tray to prevent juices from spilling into the range.

Test pie with a sharp knife to feel if apples are tender enough for your taste. If necessary, cook pie for 5 minutes more and test again. Repeat process if desired.

Cool and serve with ice cream or any of your favorite toppings.

This recipe was provided by a chef, restaurant or culinary professional. It has not been tested for home use.

 

 

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