Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time.

Follow me at: http://www.lindaleekane.com

New Hampshire : Pumpkin Pie

In the annals of pie history, New England holds a special place.

 

A moment in pie history: Pumpkin pies and Thanksgiving dinner at the home of Mr. Timothy Levy Crouch, a Rogerine Quaker living in Ledyard, Connecticut. Photo by Jack Delano, 1940. Photo courtesy Library of Congress.

Pumpkin pie might not have happened without New England, where rhubarb pie is revered in the springtime. In New England’s Little Canadas, Franco-Americans celebrate the Christmas holidays with spiced meat pies called tourtiere. Vermonters favor maple pie, and Boston is the birthplace of the Boston Cream Pie — which really isn’t a pie, but then again neither is Maine’s official state treat, the Whoopie Pie.

Robert Cox, head of Special Collections at UMass-Amherst, delves into New England’s pie history in his book, New England Pie: History Under a Crust.

The New England Historical Society interviewed Cox about his book on pie history. He has also written about New England chowder and cranberry culture.

 

 

Ingredients

For the pastry:

  • Basic pie pastry, enough for a 9-inch pie
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon full-fat coconut milk

For the filling:

  • 2 cups pumpkin purée
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup or honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Whipped cream, to serve

Directions

For the pastry:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll the dough out and press it into the bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch pie plate, using the palms of your hands to ensure the crust is even throughout. Press together any breaks in the dough. Crimp or flute the edges with your fingers. Keep any leftover pie pastry to decorate with.

Cut a round of parchment paper to fit the bottom of the crust. Fill with pie weights or dried beans. Freeze until firm, about 15 minutes.

Bake the pie shell for 10 minutes. Remove the weights and parchment paper, and bake for 5 more minutes, until the crust is golden. Leave to cool completely on a wire rack.

Roll out the leftover pie pastry between two sheets of parchment paper. Use cookie cutters to cut into shapes.

Make egg wash by mixing the egg yolk and coconut milk. Brush onto the pastry shapes. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, or until the shapes are golden. Cool completely on a wire rack.

Increase the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Place the pie shell on a rimmed baking sheet and brush the edges with the remaining egg wash.

For the filling:

Whisk together the pumpkin, eggs, coconut, milk, maple syrup, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, cardamom, lemon zest, and salt. Pour the filling into the prepared pie shell. Bake for 15 minutes. Cover the crust with foil and continue baking for 20 minutes, until the custard has set but still jiggles slightly in the center. Turn off the oven and leave the pie in the oven, with the door slightly open, for 30 minutes.

Cool at room temperature on a wire rack. Place the decorative cut-outs around the perimeter of the pie. Place the pie in the refrigerator to set fully, about 2 hours. Serve with whipped cream.

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At first I wasn’t to sure about this dessert, I was incredibly surprised.

Nevada: Basque Cake

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the realblack cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

 

 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/8 cups milk
  • 1/3 cup white sugar
  • 1/3 cup white sugar
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/8 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 1/8 cups white sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • Add all ingredients to list

Directions

  • Prep

30 m

  • Cook

1 h

  • Ready In

1 h 30 m

  1. To Make the pastry cream Filling: In a sauce pan, combine the milk and 1/3 cup of sugar. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Remove from heat. In a small bowl, combine 1/3 cup of sugar and 2 tablespoons flour. Beat in the eggs and vanilla.
  2. Mix 1/2 cup of hot milk into egg mixture, then pour the egg mixture back into the saucepan with the hot milk. Return to heat and bring to a boil. Continue cooking over medium heat until mixture thickens and becomes smooth. Remove from heat and let cool for 1 hour.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9-inch springform pan. Combine and sift the flour and baking powder. Set aside
  4. Cream 1 1/8 cup sugar and 3 eggs until light and fluffy. Fold in the sifted flour mixture in three increments, being careful not to overmix.
  5. Put half of the dough into the greased pan. Spread the dough so that it covers the bottom of the pan. Place pastry cream to within 3/4 inch of the edge. Add the second half of the cake dough, making sure to enclose all of the fillings.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes or until golden brown.
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If you have never given these delicious cookies a try…do it! Incredible.

Nebraska: Kolaches (Czech Fruit Filled Pastries)

Round breads are some of the earliest of ritual foods, variously symbolizing the sun, moon, and female. In this vein, the Slavonic word for wheel (kolo) gave its name to an ancient Eastern and Central European ritual round savory bread loaf. Then, around the 15th century with the arrival in Eastern Europe of yeast breads enriched with butter, eggs, and sugar (the first light cakes in the region), the name kolo was applied to round sweetened yeast loaves enjoyed for celebrations from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea, including the Polish kolacz (pronounced kowatch), Russian kulich, Ukrainian kolač, Serbo-Croatian kolač, Hungarian kalacs, and Yiddish koyletch (an early synonym for egg challah, considered a cake by Sephardic Jews). Distinct from the unadorned yeast cakes of Eastern Europe (or those additionally flavored with raisins), varieties from Bohemia, Moravia, and Slovenia were paired with povidla (plum butter made from cooking down Italian plums without the addition of sweeteners). Some speculate that originally people simply spread the beloved povidla on chunks of baked sweet bread to enhance the gastronomic experience. Then around the 18th century bakers began making indentations in the dough rounds before baking and filling them with povidla, resulting in a sort of a massive ‘prune Czech’ (instead of Danish). The radiating pockets of topping actually looks more like a wheel. Related to kolache are Czech buchty (buchta singular), a bun with the sweet mixture enclosed inside. The rich dough is also wrapped around a large sausage (klobasnek).
See the full post:https://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/kolache/#1Z6DhvLIZMtgUG0R.99

 

Prep: 30 min. + rising Bake: 10 min.

Makes

2 dozen

Ingredients

  • 2 packages (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup warm milk (110° to 115°)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 3 large Nellie’s Free Range Eggs
  • 4-1/2 to 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • FILLING:
  • 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

Directions

  • In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in warm milk. Add sugar, butter, salt, lemon zest, eggs and 2 cups of flour; beat until smooth. Add enough remaining flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes.
  • Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
  • Punch dough down. Divide in half; shape each half into 12 balls. Place 3 in. a part on greased baking sheets. Flatten each ball to a 3-in. circle. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  • In a small bowl, beat all filling ingredients until smooth. Make a depression in the center of each roll; add filling. Bake at 375° for 8-10 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pan to cool on a wire rack.

Sprinkle with sea salt to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time

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This sounded strange but it was incredibly delicious! Give it a try.

Montana: Alfalfa Honey Pie

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Yield: 1 9-inch pie

Serving Size: 1 slice

Ingredients

For pie crust:

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, chilled and diced
  • 1/4 cup ice water

For filling:

  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoon cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • flaked or sea salt for finishing

Directions

  • First, prepare crust. In large bowl, combine flour and salt. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until mixture forms a ball.
  • Wrap in plastic and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight.
  • On floured surface, roll crust into 12-inch Press dough evenly into bottom and sides of 9-inch pie plate. Trim edge almost even with edge of pan. Fold edges under and crimp with fingers or fork. Cover crust with plastic wrap and refrigerate for minimum of 30 minutes and maximum of 3 hours.
  • When you are ready to make the pie, preheat oven to 375°F.
  • To prepare filling, melt butter in small pan over medium heat. When foam subsides, watch closely and stir often. When white milk solids have turned brown and butter smells toasty, turn off heat and add honey, stirring until it dissolves. Let mixture cool 10 minutes before proceeding.
  • In medium-sized bowl, whisk together brown sugar, cornmeal and salt, being sure to work out any lumps in sugar. Stir in brown butter and honey mixture, vanilla and apple cider vinegar. Add eggs, 1 at a time, whisking after each addition. Whisk in heavy cream.
  • Pour filling into chilled pie shell and bake on middle rack of oven 60-75 minutes, rotating once halfway through baking. Pie is finished when filling is puffed and golden, but center is still just a bit wobbly when shaken.
·         Cool pie on wire rack for about 1 an hour before Total Time

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time!

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Missouri: Ice Cream Cone

The True Story of the Ice Cream Cone

 

The ice cream cone is said to have originated at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1904. But that leaves out an important part of history: the story of the cone inventor.

The patent for cone-making was awarded to Italo Marchiony (1868-1954) in 1903. Marchiony was a street vendor on Wall Street where he sold lemon ices from a pushcart to Wall Street brokers and runners. He had been working on a cone-making device since 1896 and filed for a patent in 1902.

And there was the mystery: If 95 percent of the sources I found credited the invention of the ice cream cone to a fellow named Ernest Hamwi at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, how were they explaining Marchiony as patent holder? As it turned out, the lore simply omitted Marchiony.

The True Story of The First Ice Cream Cone

Thanks to an article written by Jane Marchiony Paretti, Marchiony’s daughter and published originally by the Hoboken Historical Society, we have the full and complete answer.

The story begins on Wall Street where Marchiony, a resident of Hoboken, worked as a pushcart vendor. (Marchiony arrived in this country as a “Marcioni” but he or the fellow on Ellis Island Americanized the name to Marchiony.)

Like many of his countrymen, Marchiony began selling ices from a pushcart. Some customers referred to these Italian vendors as “hokey pokey men,” which derived from the vendors’ cries of Ecco un poco—meaning “here’s a little.”

To present a customer with an individual serving, the men used small glass dishes, which were to be given back to the vendor. But many of the Wall Street traders wandered off with their cups, or the cups fell and broke in transit.  Marchiony was tired of the loss and breakage of the glasses, so he wanted to come up with an edible cup in which to serve the flavored ices.

Ice Cream Cone Inventor at Work

Beginning in 1896, Marchiony spent nights in the family kitchen,experimenting with waffle-making. He found that if he folded the waffles into a cone while they were still warm they retained their shape as they cooled.

At work, his new invention was a big hit—so much so that he realized he needed a way to produce cones more quickly. Hand-making them one at a time was laborious.

As Paretti writes in her article: “Father had a good head for mechanics as well as for business, so he adapted the design of the waffle iron to create a device into which batter could be poured and baked” in multiples. The mold he was working on allowed for cooking ten cones at a time. By hinging it in the middle, there was a way to open the device to remove the fragile cups from the mold. Marchiony was satisfied with his invention by 1902 and submitted the patent application. He received patent approval in 1903.

On Wall Street these sweet treats acquired the name “toots,” probably from tutti-frutti. (Marchiony may have sold some ices or ice cream with bits of nuts or fruit.)

Louisiana Purchase Exposition

Fast forward to St. Louis in 1904. How did the legend grow that the ice cream cone began with a vendor at the Exposition?

Here we turn again to Jane Marchiony Paretti who has the answer:

Marchiony was in St. Louis as an exhibitor!

The legend, as it has been told, has been spun so that it became a story of a waffle vendor (Ernest Hamwi) who came to the rescue of an ice cream vendor who ran out of glass cups.

The true story is that Marchiony was there selling his ice cream. He could easily make up fresh batches of ice cream each night, but he couldn’t keep up with demand for the waffle cups. So this is where the truth almost connects with the legend. Instead of Hamwi having the idea for using his waffles, Marchiony turned to Hamwi, who was selling zalabis (a Syrian cookie that is like a thin waffle) and asked that Hamwi roll some of the waffles while warm so that Marchiony could use them as cones.

So there we have it: The first ice cream cones were actually sold from a pushcart on Wall Street, however, these sweet treats gained wide exposure through the St. Louis Exposition.

Other vendors at the fair began copying Marchiony, and people who enjoyed ice cream cones in St. Louis returned to their own communities with suggestions to their local ice cream stores as to a new way to sell ice cream.

Ice Cream Cone Inventor’s Later Life

After the Exposition, Italo Marchiony returned to Hoboken and established a cone-making factory. He also built up a fleet of street vendors who sold his ice cream cones. At one point, he had 45 street vendors out selling ice cream cones on the streets of Manhattan.

According to Paretti, Marchiony went on to create ice cream sandwiches. His factory made small cookies and sold them with ice cream inside.  The Wall Street brokers were said to find ice cream sandwiches to be more dignified to eat than ice cream cones.

Marchiony retired in 1938 and had a comfortable retirement until his death in 1954. His ice cream brand was ultimately acquired by Schrafft’s.

Now go grab and ice cream cone and add your favorite ice cream! Enjoy!

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time.

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My family enjoyed these, I mean who doesn’t love blueberries? As a dessert, not me, but for breakfast…oh, yes!

 

Minnesota: Blueberry Muffin

Official State Muffin of Minnesota. … The third graders were inspired by a Massachusetts class who lobbied for the corn muffin to become an official symbol in that state. The children chose the blueberry muffin because wheat is an important crop in southern Minnesota and wild blueberries are common in northern Minnesota.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter (softened)
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 cups fresh Minnesota blueberries
  • 3 tsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. freshly grated orange peel

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream butter and 1-1/4 cups sugar until light. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each.

Sift together the flour, salt, and baking powder. Add dry mixture to the creamed mixture, alternately with the milk. Crush 1/2 cup blueberries with a fork and mix into batter. Fold in remaining whole berries and add orange peel.

Fill large muffin cups (use paper liners or grease cups). Sprinkle tops with 3 teaspoons of sugar. Bake at 375 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes. Cool for 30 minutes before removing.

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New Hampshire : Pumpkin Pie

 

Now this is a pumpkin pie for a thanksgiving gathering!

In the annals of pie history, New England holds a special place.

 

A moment in pie history: Pumpkin pies and Thanksgiving dinner at the home of Mr. Timothy Levy Crouch, a Rogerine Quaker living in Ledyard, Connecticut. Photo by Jack Delano, 1940. Photo courtesy Library of Congress.

Pumpkin pie might not have happened without New England, where rhubarb pie is revered in the springtime. In New England’s Little Canadas, Franco-Americans celebrate the Christmas holidays with spiced meat pies called tourtiere. Vermonters favor maple pie, and Boston is the birthplace of the Boston Cream Pie — which really isn’t a pie, but then again neither is Maine’s official state treat, the Whoopie Pie.

Robert Cox, head of Special Collections at UMass-Amherst, delves into New England’s pie history in his book, New England Pie: History Under a Crust.

The New England Historical Society interviewed Cox about his book on pie history. He has also written about New England chowder and cranberry culture.

 

 

Ingredients

For the pastry:

  • Basic pie pastry, enough for a 9-inch pie
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon full-fat coconut milk

For the filling:

  • 2 cups pumpkin purée
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup or honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Whipped cream, to serve

Directions

For the pastry:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll the dough out and press it into the bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch pie plate, using the palms of your hands to ensure the crust is even throughout. Press together any breaks in the dough. Crimp or flute the edges with your fingers. Keep any leftover pie pastry to decorate with.

Cut a round of parchment paper to fit the bottom of the crust. Fill with pie weights or dried beans. Freeze until firm, about 15 minutes.

Bake the pie shell for 10 minutes. Remove the weights and parchment paper, and bake for 5 more minutes, until the crust is golden. Leave to cool completely on a wire rack.

Roll out the leftover pie pastry between two sheets of parchment paper. Use cookie cutters to cut into shapes.

Make egg wash by mixing the egg yolk and coconut milk. Brush onto the pastry shapes. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, or until the shapes are golden. Cool completely on a wire rack.

Increase the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Place the pie shell on a rimmed baking sheet and brush the edges with the remaining egg wash.

For the filling:

Whisk together the pumpkin, eggs, coconut, milk, maple syrup, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, cardamom, lemon zest, and salt. Pour the filling into the prepared pie shell. Bake for 15 minutes. Cover the crust with foil and continue baking for 20 minutes, until the custard has set but still jiggles slightly in the center. Turn off the oven and leave the pie in the oven, with the door slightly open, for 30 minutes.

Cool at room temperature on a wire rack. Place the decorative cut-outs around the perimeter of the pie. Place the pie in the refrigerator to set fully, about 2 hours. Serve with whipped cream.

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This is very good but it was a little tricky for me.

Nevada: Basque Cake

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the realblack cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

 

 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/8 cups milk
  • 1/3 cup white sugar
  • 1/3 cup white sugar
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/8 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 1/8 cups white sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • Add all ingredients to list

Directions

  • Prep

30 m

  • Cook

1 h

  • Ready In

1 h 30 m

  1. To Make the pastry cream Filling: In a sauce pan, combine the milk and 1/3 cup of sugar. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Remove from heat. In a small bowl, combine 1/3 cup of sugar and 2 tablespoons flour. Beat in the eggs and vanilla.
  2. Mix 1/2 cup of hot milk into egg mixture, then pour the egg mixture back into the saucepan with the hot milk. Return to heat and bring to a boil. Continue cooking over medium heat until mixture thickens and becomes smooth. Remove from heat and let cool for 1 hour.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9-inch springform pan. Combine and sift the flour and baking powder. Set aside
  4. Cream 1 1/8 cup sugar and 3 eggs until light and fluffy. Fold in the sifted flour mixture in three increments, being careful not to overmix.
  5. Put half of the dough into the greased pan. Spread the dough so that it covers the bottom of the pan. Place pastry cream to within 3/4 inch of the edge. Add the second half of the cake dough, making sure to enclose all of the fillings.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes or until golden brown.
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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time!

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Now this is a cookie!

Nebraska: Kolaches (Czech Fruit Filled Pastries)

Round breads are some of the earliest of ritual foods, variously symbolizing the sun, moon, and female. In this vein, the Slavonic word for wheel (kolo) gave its name to an ancient Eastern and Central European ritual round savory bread loaf. Then, around the 15th century with the arrival in Eastern Europe of yeast breads enriched with butter, eggs, and sugar (the first light cakes in the region), the name kolo was applied to round sweetened yeast loaves enjoyed for celebrations from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea, including the Polish kolacz (pronounced kowatch), Russian kulich, Ukrainian kolač, Serbo-Croatian kolač, Hungarian kalacs, and Yiddish koyletch (an early synonym for egg challah, considered a cake by Sephardic Jews). Distinct from the unadorned yeast cakes of Eastern Europe (or those additionally flavored with raisins), varieties from Bohemia, Moravia, and Slovenia were paired with povidla (plum butter made from cooking down Italian plums without the addition of sweeteners). Some speculate that originally people simply spread the beloved povidla on chunks of baked sweet bread to enhance the gastronomic experience. Then around the 18th century bakers began making indentations in the dough rounds before baking and filling them with povidla, resulting in a sort of a massive ‘prune Czech’ (instead of Danish). The radiating pockets of topping actually looks more like a wheel. Related to kolache are Czech buchty (buchta singular), a bun with the sweet mixture enclosed inside. The rich dough is also wrapped around a large sausage (klobasnek).
See the full post:https://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/kolache/#1Z6DhvLIZMtgUG0R.99

 

Prep: 30 min. + rising Bake: 10 min.

Makes

2 dozen

Ingredients

  • 2 packages (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup warm milk (110° to 115°)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 3 large Nellie’s Free Range Eggs
  • 4-1/2 to 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • FILLING:
  • 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

Directions

  • In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in warm milk. Add sugar, butter, salt, lemon zest, eggs and 2 cups of flour; beat until smooth. Add enough remaining flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes.
  • Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
  • Punch dough down. Divide in half; shape each half into 12 balls. Place 3 in. a part on greased baking sheets. Flatten each ball to a 3-in. circle. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  • In a small bowl, beat all filling ingredients until smooth. Make a depression in the center of each roll; add filling. Bake at 375° for 8-10 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pan to cool on a wire rack.

Sprinkle with sea salt to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

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Bringing the US together one state dessert at a time!

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I wasn’t sure at first about this pie, was I surprised!

Montana: Alfalfa Honey Pie

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Yield: 1 9-inch pie

Serving Size: 1 slice

Ingredients

For pie crust:

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, chilled and diced
  • 1/4 cup ice water

For filling:

  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoon cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • flaked or sea salt for finishing

Directions

  • First, prepare crust. In large bowl, combine flour and salt. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until mixture forms a ball.
  • Wrap in plastic and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight.
  • On floured surface, roll crust into 12-inch Press dough evenly into bottom and sides of 9-inch pie plate. Trim edge almost even with edge of pan. Fold edges under and crimp with fingers or fork. Cover crust with plastic wrap and refrigerate for minimum of 30 minutes and maximum of 3 hours.
  • When you are ready to make the pie, preheat oven to 375°F.
  • To prepare filling, melt butter in small pan over medium heat. When foam subsides, watch closely and stir often. When white milk solids have turned brown and butter smells toasty, turn off heat and add honey, stirring until it dissolves. Let mixture cool 10 minutes before proceeding.
  • In medium-sized bowl, whisk together brown sugar, cornmeal and salt, being sure to work out any lumps in sugar. Stir in brown butter and honey mixture, vanilla and apple cider vinegar. Add eggs, 1 at a time, whisking after each addition. Whisk in heavy cream.
  • Pour filling into chilled pie shell and bake on middle rack of oven 60-75 minutes, rotating once halfway through baking. Pie is finished when filling is puffed and golden, but center is still just a bit wobbly when shaken.
·         Cool pie on wire rack for about 1 an hour before Total Time

 

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